Easy St. Patrick’s Day Countdown Banner

Easy St. Patrick's Day Countdown Banner

I meant to shell out the extra money and order an adorable countdown banner or bunting from Etsy for St. Patrick’s Day this year. I remembered my plan on the 24th of February, which didn’t seem like enough time to place a special order. So I decided to make one myself—limited crafting ability and all.

I simply used construction paper, a shamrock template printed on card stock, scissors, fun scissors, glue, a ribbon initially and then eventually some twine, initially some plain little clothes pins, and eventually little green clothes pins.

Easy St. Patrick's Day Countdown Banner

I also printed out the numbers on plain computer paper using the Patrick font for my numbers.

Free Patrick Font

The twine and green clothes pins weren’t added until two days ago.

I hung my St. Patrick’s Day countdown banner on March 1st, as you do, with green ribbon. Let me rephrase: I hung it with super cheap green Christmas holiday ribbon, the kind that comes on a roll with red and white but it’s so cheap it doesn’t even have the ribbing to make it twirl when you run scissors along it. Yeah, that cheap. I honestly didn’t know we still owned that roll of ribbon; we purchased it while still living in the apartment. It’s been a minute.

This ribbon was the worst crafting choice of my life. I hung the first shamrock and the last shamrock (to keep the weight even) without problem. Any and every shamrock placed thereafter flipped upside down as the ribbon continued to twist and turn. I eventually made all the shamrocks after the eight face the right way, but the shamrocks before the eight would not cooperate. At all. Ever. For the life of me.

Adorable Twine and Clothes Pins

So when the twine and new green clothes pins (because how adorable are they?!) arrived from a store on Etsy, I pulled it back down and rehung everything. I love the metallic accent in the twine. I imagine I’ll use it for other things. Like tying up leprechauns.

Much Better!

After I hung it the first time, flipped over shamrocks and all, the boys came into the dining room, oohing and ahhing over my creation.

“Mommy, I really like your Advent calendar.”
“Uh, it’s not an Advent calendar, Buddy.”
“It’s just a countdown. Right, Mommy?”
“Yep.”
“Oh. I really wanted to do an activity every day.”

Apparently my Advent activities and homemade calendar ruined my children for ordinary countdowns. Oh well. At least it looks cute!

Easy St. Patrick's Day Countdown Banner

 

 

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How to Make a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

I originally started saving wine corks to make a shadow box of corks for our eventual basement bar renovation. Since that project won’t be started any time soon, I started thinking about making a wine cork heart to hang in the dining room.

However, the holiday spirit struck me one day and I decided to make a wine cork Christmas tree.

If you know me, you know that crafting isn’t my forte. However, this little Christmas tree is so easy to make even I didn’t screw it up. Too badly.

How to Make a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

How to Make a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

1. Drink all the wine. Darn the luck! (You can also buy the corks, but boring.)

2. Save all the corks. Of special note: The looks most uniform when you use the same brand (thus size and shape) cork. However, if you’re going for “real trees aren’t symmetrical,” different corks will work just fine. You’ll need more glue and a bit more patience.

3. Set up your station with newspaper, glue (I used Rubber Cement, more on that later), and your corks.

Making a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

Making a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

4. Turn on Christmas music.

5. Set up your bottom row and bookend them with two other corks. I went with eight on my bottom row as ten made the tree a little bigger than I wanted.

Making a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

6. Start gluing! Rubber Cement worked nicely since it has a brush. Just glop it all over, getting in between each cork.

7. Once you finish the bottom row, start moving up the tree, putting each cork in a grooved slot from the row below.

Making a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

8. Voila! Wine Cork… triangle?

Making a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

9. So add a stump! Important: If you don’t wait for your gluing agent to dry completely, once you add the stump and sit it upright, you’ll have some drooping and falling apart. And so, go with a hot glue gun. I don’t have one as I don’t really craft. I should get one just for cork projects. Rubber Cement takes forever to fully dry, so you’ll need to let it dry flat instead of standing it up for about two days. Eventually it does dry even if you use Rubber Cement, but be patient with it.

10. Tada! Wine Cork Christmas Tree!

Making a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

Initially I planned on painting and/or using Sharpies to color the tree green, the stump brown, the top circle yellow for a star, and a few red ornaments. But I decided I liked the plain cork-iness of this tree. If I make another one in the future (think of it: a whole wine cork forest), I may paint that one.

I placed the wine cork Christmas tree next to the ceramic trees from our grandmothers and the nativity set gifted to me last year by my mother—because what says Jesus more than wine, right? (Water into wine. Wine corks into a Christmas tree. Get it? Perfect.)

How to Make a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

How to Make a Wine Cork Christmas Tree

These also make great gifts for your favorite wine drinker.

Merry Wine Drinking Christmas!